Your brand carries value, and its our job to make sure its reached its fullest potential. BubbleUP can help develop your brand and ensure its full integration into our web designs, print materials, and all other media outlets.
Accounting is the measurement, processing and communication of financial information about economic entities[15][16] such as businesses and corporations. The modern field was established by the Italian mathematician Luca Pacioli in 1494.[17] Accounting, which has been called the “language of business”,[18] measures the results of an organization’s economic activities and conveys this information to a variety of users, including investors, creditors, management, and regulators.[19] Practitioners of accounting are known as accountants. The terms “accounting” and “financial reporting” are often used as synonyms.
Marketing research, conducted for the purpose of new product development or product improvement, is often concerned with identifying the consumer’s unmet needs. [13] Customer needs are central to market segmentation which is concerned with dividing markets into distinct groups of buyers on the basis of “distinct needs, characteristics, or behaviors who might require separate products or marketing mixes.” [14] Needs-based segmentation (also known as benefit segmentation) “places the customers’ desires at the forefront of how a company designs and markets products or services.” [15] Although needs-based segmentation is difficult to do in practice, has been proved to be one of the most effective ways to segment a market. [16] In addition, a great deal of advertising and promotion is designed to show how a given product’s benefits meet the customer’s needs, wants or expectations in a unique way.[17]
The Marketing major at the Alberta School of Business is built on the strength of our faculty’s world-class research in the areas of retailing, market research, and consumer behavior. The major combines research-based principles with innovative teaching methods; in addition to lectures and discussions, you’ll participate in managerial cases, group projects, and market simulations. You’ll also develop practical skills in areas such as consumer and market analysis, managerial decision-making, and implementing marketing programs, preparing you to engage in sophisticated marketing practice.
A firm employing a product orientation is mainly concerned with the quality of its own product. A product orientation is based on the assumption that, all things being equal, consumers will purchase products of a superior quality. The approach is most effective when the firm has deep insights into customers and their needs and desires derived from research and (or) intuition and understands consumers’ quality expectations and price they are willing to pay. For example, Sony Walkman and Apple iPod were innovative product designs that addressed consumers’ unmet needs. Although the product orientation has largely been supplanted by the marketing orientation, firms practising a product orientation can still be found in haute couture and in arts marketing. [22]
Jump up ^ Kerr, F., Patti, C. and Ichul, K., “An Inside-out Approach to Integrated Marketing Communications: An International Perspective,” International Journal of Advertising, Vol. 27, No.4, 2008, pp 531-540
Some authors cite a further P – Packaging – this is thought by many to be part of Product, but in certain markets (Japan, China for example) and with certain products (perfume, cosmetics) the packaging of a product has a greater importance – maybe even than the product itself.
The first entry-level job will provide a level of experience that can’t be matched by any internship. If a marketing professional has aspirations for a graduate degree or more advanced marketing positions with more responsibility, gaining experience will be crucial. Entry level marketing jobs may include marketing analyst, marketing associate, marketing assistant or marketing specialist. People in these jobs may help collect and analyze marketing data and perform other administrative tasks as needed, all while gaining valuable experience in marketing.
Depending on career goals and overall ambition, a graduate degree may be needed. This is especially true for those at upper level management and leadership positions, such as chief marketing officers or vice president of sales. While there are marketing graduate degrees, a graduate degree like a Master of Business Administration (MBA) is highly advisable to get to the very top of the ladder. Other graduate marketing degrees are more focused on a specific aspect of marketing, such as digital marketing and marketing management. For other positions, such as researcher or professor, a PhD could be recommended.
Depending upon the profession, an aspiring marketer can seek out anything from a certificate to a PhD – and in most cases, these programs can be found not only in brick-and-mortar schools, but online as well. Here’s a rundown of what to expect from each level.
Most marketing careers require a bachelor’s degree and some require or recommend a graduate degree. No matter which degree is eventually obtained, it all starts with getting a high school diploma. While most high school courses don’t relate directly to marketing, doing well in classes such as English and math is important. Additionally, if there are any clubs or organizations in your school that promote business or communications, you should dip your toe into the marketing pool by becoming involved in them. Student leadership can also teach high school students about marketing and promotions.
There’s no doubt that marketers are masters at influencing the masses to learn about, purchase, and enjoy the world’s products and services. Does this sound like a profession in which you would thrive?
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,