The bachelor’s degree is the primary degree for beginning a marketing career. The degree provides a comprehensive education in marketing and business principles; it’s no wonder a large percentage of entry-level marketing positions require it. Students can expect to take four years to complete the degree. In addition to general education and personal elective courses, students will usually find the following classes as a part of their bachelor’s degree marketing curriculum:
Businesses often have important “intellectual property” that needs protection from competitors for the company to stay profitable. This could require patents, copyrights, trademarks, or preservation of trade secrets. Most businesses have names, logos, and similar branding techniques that could benefit from trademarking. Patents and copyrights in the United States are largely governed by federal law, while trade secrets and trademarking are mostly a matter of state law. Because of the nature of intellectual property, a business needs protection in every jurisdiction in which they are concerned about competitors. Many countries are signatories to international treaties concerning intellectual property, and thus companies registered in these countries are subject to national laws bound by these treaties. In order to protect trade secrets, companies may require employees to sign noncompete clauses which will impose limitations on an employee’s interactions with stakeholders, and competitors.
A catalog admin can add, update or delete items in a catalog, create product sets and change catalog settings. A catalog advertiser can create and edit product sets in a catalog to run campaigns, but they can’t modify items in the catalog or change catalog settings.
Cooperative: Often referred to as a “co-op”, a cooperative is a limited-liability business that can organize as for-profit or not-for-profit. A cooperative differs from a corporation in that it has members, not shareholders, and they share decision-making authority. Cooperatives are typically classified as either consumer cooperatives or worker cooperatives. Cooperatives are fundamental to the ideology of economic democracy.
Perhaps you connect easily with the online world and think social media is the best way to market products nowadays, or maybe you have an eye for analyzing data and think researching sales trends sounds fun. No matter what your interest or skills are, there’s room for you in the wide world of marketing.
Introduced in 2011, the Real Estate Program at the School of Business has become a central hub for connecting students with industry professionals. Many students choose to augment other majors with selected real estate courses.
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,