These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘business.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.
Some businesses are subject to ongoing special regulation, for example, public utilities, investment securities, banking, insurance, broadcasting, aviation, and health care providers. Environmental regulations are also very complex and can affect many businesses.
Finance is a field that deals with the study of investments. It includes the dynamics of assets and liabilities over time under conditions of different degrees of uncertainty and risk. Finance can also be defined as the science of money management. Finance aims to price assets based on their risk level and their expected rate of return. Finance can be broken into three different sub-categories: public finance, corporate finance and personal finance.
I want to conduct high level marketing research to study consumer habits and understand why shoppers make the decisions they do. I also would to become a professor and teach at the college or university level.
The message that you use and the brand image that you develop are critical to getting people to know and like your product. Your message needs to convince consumers that they need or want your product, and that it will bring them value. Your brand has to be engaging enough that they remember it and think of your business and product when making purchasing decisions or recommending products to their friends.
A very detailed and well-established body of rules that evolved over a very long period of time applies to commercial transactions. The need to regulate trade and commerce and resolve business disputes helped shape the creation of law and courts. The Code of Hammurabi dates back to about 1772 BC for example, and contains provisions that relate, among other matters, to shipping costs and dealings between merchants and brokers.[26] The word “corporation” derives from the Latin corpus, meaning body, and the Maurya Empire in Iron-Age India accorded legal rights to business entities.[27]
An example is coupons or a sale. People are given an incentive to buy, but this does not build customer loyalty or encourage future repeat buys. A major drawback of sales promotion is that it is easily copied by competition. It cannot be used as a sustainable source of differentiation.
Retailers, wholesalers, and distributors act as middlemen and get goods produced by manufacturers to the intended consumers; they make their profits by marking up their prices. Most stores and catalog companies are distributors or retailers.
Employment opportunities are wide ranging for Marketing graduates. You will be well-prepared to pursue a career in consumer marketing, sales, merchandising, advertising, communications, customer service, or marketing research. Your external focus will provide you a perspective that many organizations find valuable in senior managers.
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The Economist reported a recent conference in Rome on the subject of the simulation of adaptive human behavior.[60] It shared mechanisms to increase impulse buying and get people “to buy more by playing on the herd instinct.” The basic idea is that people will buy more of products that are seen to be popular, and several feedback mechanisms to get product popularity information to consumers are mentioned, including smart-cart technology and the use of Radio Frequency Identification Tag technology. A “swarm-moves” model was introduced by a Florida Institute of Technology researcher, which is appealing to supermarkets because it can “increase sales without the need to give people discounts.”
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,