The “marketing mix” gained widespread acceptance with the publication, in 1960, of E. Jerome McCarthy’s text, Basic Marketing: A Managerial Approach which outlined the ingredients in the mix as the memorable 4 Ps, namely product, price, place and promotion. [39] The marketing mix is based upon four controllable variables that a company manages in its effort to satisfy the corporation’s objectives as well as the needs and wants of a target market.[35] Once there is understanding of the target market’s interests, marketers develop tactics, using the 4Ps, to encourage buyers to purchase product. The successful use of the model is predicated upon the degree to which the target market’s needs and wants have been understood, and the extent to which marketers have developed and correctly deployed the tactics. Today, the marketing mix or marketing program is understood to refer to the “set of marketing tools that the firm uses to pursue its marketing objectives in the target market”.[40]
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,