For example, a clothing manufacturer may consider a number of possible target markets — toddlers, athletes, grandparents, teenagers and tourists. A general profile of each of these potential markets will reveal which ones are most realistic, pose less risk and are more likely to show a profit. A test market survey of the most likely target groups, or those who buy for them, such as parents for babies and toddlers, can help you separate real target markets from unlikely possibilities.
 Western Canada retook its lead in the country’s growth tables last year, with Alberta recording the fastest expansion among the 10 provinces and British Columbia posting its strongest pace in more than a decade.
Marketing researchers use statistical methods (such as quantitative research, qualitative research, hypothesis tests, Chi-square tests, linear regression, correlation coefficients, frequency distributions, Poisson and binomial distributions, etc.) to interpret their findings and convert data into information.[55]
The product life cycle (PLC) is a tool used by marketing managers to gauge the progress of a product, especially relating to sales or revenue accrued over time. The PLC is based on a few key assumptions, including:
Web3 not only designed our logo for our company, but they also built us an excellent website. Most of all, the staff are friendly and knowledgeable, and return your questions via email or phone call promptly. — Scott O20/27
Professional credentials are also available for those who want to further their careers and be certified as specialists. The American Marketing Association recommends the Professional Certified Marketer (PCM) credential, which demonstrates that the individual stays current on best practices in the field. The Professional Researcher Certification (PRC) offered by the Marketing Research Association is designed for market research analysts. Those who wish to specialize in the area of public relations can earn a professional certification from the Public Relations Society of America.
Jump up ^ Kotler, P., Marketing Management (Millennium Edition), Custom Edition for University of Phoenix, Prentice Hall, 2000, p. 9; Quelch, J. A. and Jocz, K.E., All Business is Local: Why Place Matters More than Ever in a Global, Virtual World, Penguin, 2012, p. 4
Individuals interested in a leadership or executive position may excel as a chief marketing officer (CMO) of a company. These executives are in charge of coordinating all marketing, media, creative, advertising, and public relations activities, implementing a cohesive plan designed to propel the organization toward its sales objectives. They are creative and analytical in their approach and must have strong leadership skills to delegate tasks and projects to appropriate departments.
After I finish high school, I’d like to start working as soon as possible while keeping the option of getting a bachelor’s degree open. I want something that gives me enough training so I can begin working within a few years.
In a product innovation approach, the company pursues product innovation, then tries to develop a market for the product. Product innovation drives the process and marketing research is conducted primarily to ensure that profitable market segment(s) exist for the innovation. The rationale is that customers may not know what options will be available to them in the future so we should not expect them to tell us what they will buy in the future. However, marketers can aggressively over-pursue product innovation and try to overcapitalize on a niche. When pursuing a product innovation approach, marketers must ensure that they have a varied and multi-tiered approach to product innovation. It is claimed that if Thomas Edison depended on marketing research he would have produced larger candles rather than inventing light bulbs. Many firms, such as research and development focused companies, successfully focus on product innovation. Many purists doubt whether this is really a form of marketing orientation at all, because of the ex post status of consumer research. Some even question whether it is marketing.
Demand for a good begins to taper off, and the firm may opt to discontinue manufacture of the product. This is so, if revenue for the product comes from efficiency savings in production, over actual sales of a good/service. However, if a product services a niche market, or is complementary to another product, it may continue manufacture of the product, despite a low level of sales/revenue being accrued.
Convenience, shopping, specialty or unsought good: Is your product something that people pick up regularly when doing their errands (convenience good); is it something they would shop for and compare different brands (shopping good); is it something special they would only buy infrequently, like an expensive gift or luxury item (specialty good); or is it something they don’t really want, but may need to buy (unsought good)? Understanding which category your product fits into will be important in determining how to price it, where to sell it and how to promote it.
Sports marketing professionals have a solid professional background that spans economics, sports marketing strategies, and media advertising. In the high-intensity world of professional and collegiate sports, these account executives are responsible for securing ad placements and identifying and developing sponsorship opportunities. They may also work with leagues, teams, and individual players and their representatives to coordinate various marketing activities.
This refers to how the product gets to the customer; the distribution channels and intermediaries such as wholesalers and retailers who enable customers to access products or services in a convenient manner. This third P has also sometimes been called Place, referring to the channel by which a product or service is sold (e.g. online vs. retail), which geographic region or industry, to which segment (young adults, families, business people), etc. also referring to how the environment in which the product is sold in can affect sales.
Marketing degrees are not only found at multiple levels, but with varying concentrations and opportunities for specialization. Some degrees are for entry-level positions and provide a solid foundational knowledge base for any number of marketing careers. Other degrees are more specific, such as the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), which is targeted toward research and teaching, and offer specialty areas such as behavioral and quantitative marketing. Many of these unique marketing degrees found at the graduate level also prepare students for leadership and management roles upon graduation.
An associate degree in marketing could be a solid choice for those who want to learn about marketing, but don’t want to commit to a full bachelor’s degree and/or would like to begin working as soon as possible. Depending on the program, an associate degree can allow graduates to begin working within two years after high school, sometimes even less. And if the students decide to get a bachelor’s degree, most if not all of the associate degree credits will count toward that degree.
Jump up ^ Hooley, G., Fahy, J., Beracs, J., Fonfara, K. and Snoj, B., “Market Orientation in the Transition Economies of Central Europe: Tests of the Narver and Slater Market Orientation Scales,” Journal of Business Research, Vol. 50, 2000, pp 273–285. Note that the most widely applied scale is that developed by Narver and Slater in Narver, J.C., and Slater, S.F., The Effect of Marketing Orientation on Business Profitability,” Journal of Marketing, Vo. 54, 1990, pp 20–35
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,