Franchises: A franchise is a system in which entrepreneurs purchase the rights to open and run a business from a larger corporation.[10] Franchising in the United States is widespread and is a major economic powerhouse. One out of twelve retail businesses in the United States are franchised and 8 million people are employed in a franchised business.[11]
A firm’s marketing macro-environment consists of a variety of external factors that manifest on a large (or macro) scale. These are typically economic, social, political or technological phenomena. A common method of assessing a firm’s macro-environment is via a PESTLE (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal, Ecological) analysis. Within a PESTLE analysis, a firm would analyze national political issues, culture and climate, key macroeconomic conditions, health and indicators (such as economic growth, inflation, unemployment, etc.), social trends/attitudes, and the nature of technology’s impact on its society and the business processes within the society.
Corporation: The owners of a corporation have limited liability and the business has a separate legal personality from its owners. Corporations can be either government-owned or privately owned. They can organize either for profit or as nonprofit organizations. A privately owned, for-profit corporation is owned by its shareholders, who elect a board of directors to direct the corporation and hire its managerial staff. A privately owned, for-profit corporation can be either privately held by a small group of individuals, or publicly held, with publicly traded shares listed on a stock exchange.
The Chartered Institute of Marketing defines marketing as “the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.”[6] A similar concept is the value-based marketing which states the role of marketing to contribute to increasing shareholder value.[7] In this context, marketing can be defined as “the management process that seeks to maximise returns to shareholders by developing relationships with valued customers and creating a competitive advantage.”[7]
Agriculture, such as the domestication of fish, animals and livestock, as well as lumber, oil and mining businesses that extract natural resources and raw materials, such as wood, petroleum, natural gas, ores, plants or minerals.
Even though the field of marketing is diverse, most positions center around the core elements of communications, business strategy, and advertising. Some marketing professionals specialize in a certain area of marketing, such as content marketing or graphic design, while demand in the digital arena is expanding as consumers depend evermore on mobile devices and web-based technologies. Career paths that combine creativity, innovation, and digital technologies are emerging as some of the highest-paying jobs in the industry. Below is a look at salaries for three related occupations:
Needs: Something necessary for people to live a healthy, stable and safe life. When needs remain unfulfilled, there is a clear adverse outcome: a dysfunction or death. Needs can be objective and physical, such as the need for food, water and shelter; or subjective and psychological, such as the need to belong to a family or social group and the need for self-esteem.
Marketing is defined by the American Marketing Association as “the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.”[20] The term developed from the original meaning which referred literally to going to a market to buy or sell goods or services. Marketing tactics include advertising as well as determining product pricing.
The term “marketing environment” relates to all of the factors (whether internal, external, direct or indirect) that affect a firm’s marketing decision-making/planning. A firm’s marketing environment consists of three main areas, which are:
A 2011 meta analyses[26] has found that the factors with the greatest impact on sales performance are a salesperson’s sales related knowledge (knowledge of market segments, sales presentation skills, conflict resolution, and products), degree of adaptiveness (changing behaviour based on the aforementioned knowledge), role clarity (salesperson’s role is to expressly to sell), cognitive aptitude (intelligence) and work engagement (motivation and interest in a sales role).
Morgan, in Riding the Waves of Change (Jossey-Bass, 1988), suggests that one of the greatest limitations of the 4 Ps approach “is that it unconsciously emphasizes the inside–out view (looking from the company outwards), whereas the essence of marketing should be the outside–in approach”. An inside-out approach is the traditional planning approach where the organisation identifies its desired goals and objectives which are often based around what has always been done. Marketing’s task then becomes one of “selling” the organisation’s products and messages to the “outside” or external stakeholders.[43] In contrast, an outside-in approach first seeks to understand the needs and wants of the consumer. [44]
Limited liability companies (LLC), limited liability partnerships, and other specific types of business organization protect their owners or shareholders from business failure by doing business under a separate legal entity with certain legal protections. In contrast, unincorporated businesses or persons working on their own are usually not as protected.[8][9]
In our last blog we focused on the values of agile marketing, and in this post we’ll explain how these values translate into benefits for yourself and your company. Agile marketing guru Jim Ewel touches on four of those main benefits. Benefits of agile marketing…
The functional level relates to departments within the SBUs, such as marketing, finance, HR, production, etc. The functional level would adopt the SBU’s strategy and determine how to accomplish the SBU’s own objectives in its market.
Depending on career goals and overall ambition, a graduate degree may be needed. This is especially true for those at upper level management and leadership positions, such as chief marketing officers or vice president of sales. While there are marketing graduate degrees, a graduate degree like a Master of Business Administration (MBA) is highly advisable to get to the very top of the ladder. Other graduate marketing degrees are more focused on a specific aspect of marketing, such as digital marketing and marketing management. For other positions, such as researcher or professor, a PhD could be recommended.
A strategic business unit (SBU) is a subsidiary within a firm, which participates within a given market/industry. The SBU would embrace the corporate strategy, and attune it to its own particular industry. For instance, an SBU may partake in the sports goods industry. It thus would ascertain how it would attain additional sales of sports goods, in order to satisfy the overall business strategy.
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,