Most marketing careers require a bachelor’s degree and some require or recommend a graduate degree. No matter which degree is eventually obtained, it all starts with getting a high school diploma. While most high school courses don’t relate directly to marketing, doing well in classes such as English and math is important. Additionally, if there are any clubs or organizations in your school that promote business or communications, you should dip your toe into the marketing pool by becoming involved in them. Student leadership can also teach high school students about marketing and promotions.
The bachelor’s degree is the standard minimum for many marketing professions. A marketing degree usually takes four years to complete and is commonly found as a staple major at most college and universities. Marketing is customarily part of business studies, so while some marketing degrees may be in marketing, others may be in business with a marketing emphasis.
Jump up ^ Hunt, Shelby D. and Goolsby, Jerry, “The Rise and Fall of the Functional Approach to Marketing: A Paradigm Displacement Perspective,” in Historical Perspectives in Marketing: Essays in Honour of Stanley Hollander, Terence Nevett and Ronald Fullerton (eds), Lexington, MA, Lexington Books, pp 35-37, sdh.ba.ttu.edu/Rise%20and%20Fall%20(88).pdf; Wilkie, W. L. and Moore, E.S., “Scholarly Research in Marketing: Exploring the “4 Eras” of Thought Development,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2003, p. 123; Constantinides, E., “The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing,” Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 22, 2006, pp 407-438,